Kaingo Hides

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stamp3The Kaingo Hides

The hides, which are built by Derek Shenton, are in one of the most remote areas of the South Luangwa National Park and accessible to guests staying at Kaingo and Mwamba Camps. Many photographers, including National Geographic’s Frans Lanting, have praised the ingenuity of these hides. Like Kaingo and Mwamba Camps these hides are set up each year and have a very light footprint.

How we rate Kaingo Hides

Wildlife starstarstarstarstar
Wilderness starstarstarstarstar
Environmental Sensitivity starstarstarstarstar

What you will see

Kaingo has three hides:

  • The hippo hide takes you up close and personal to a group of about 100 hippos, which are found at hippo corner on a bend of the Luangwa River where it meets the Mwamba channel. Birds, monitor lizards and all manner of game may be seen from the hide, but it’s mostly about hippos.
  • The carmine bee-eater hide, which is open from August to November, is designed for viewing these very colourful birds as they nest. It’s a floating hide, and guests need to wade through water to reach it.
  • The elephant-viewing hide is built high in a tree overlooking a very well-used game path that crosses the Luangwa River. The landscape is outstanding. It’s close to camp and guests are often alerted to the herds before they approach the hide.

When to visit

The hides are at their best from July onwards depending upon the rains. The carmine bee-eaters usually arrive in September and stay until November. They are most easily viewed early in the season before they have dug too deep.

What it costs

The hides are only open to guests staying at Kaingo and Mwamba. Details are on those pages.

Photographers need to know

There is nothing not to love about these hides, and this camp has some of the best game viewing areas and guides in South Luangwa.